German Ministry of Education and Research to Fund two RWTH Microelectronics Projects

14/10/2019

Microelectronics is a major driving force for innovation and digitalization and a key technology to sustain the economic wellbeing of Germany and of Europe. To actively support this field, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research has initiated the "Research for New Microelectronics” funding line, ForMikro for short.

 

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NobleNEMS

The NobleNEMS project is coordinated by Professor Max Lemme, Chair of Electronic Devices at RWTH Aachen University (ELD). The project seeks to demonstrate highly sensitive nanoelectromechanical sensors (NEMS) made of two-dimensional materials that contain noble metals such as platinum or palladium.

As Lemme explains, “we expect to significantly improve the sensitivity and the scalability of membrane-based pressure sensors and microphones. In the long run, I also see potential for applications of this technology in accelerometers, environmental sensors, and infrared photodetectors.”

Aside from RWTH, TU Dresden, the Bundeswehr University Munich, and the companies Infineon, ATV, Witec, and AMO contribute to the project. With its activities in research and teaching, the Aachen Graphene & 2D Materials Center is also involved in NobleNEMS.

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+49 241 80 27891

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SiGeSn nanoFETs

The SiGeSn nanoFETs project, which is coordinated by Professor Joachim Knoch, Chair of Semiconductor Electronics at RWTH Aachen University (IHT), has a focus on post-silicon nanoelectronics. The aim is to exploit the full potential of SiGeSn – an alloy that contains silicon, germanium and tin – for the realization of transistors and integrated circuits.

“To evaluate the potential of SiGeSn along the entire value chain, we will adopt a closed feedback loop between material optimization, device design, and fabrication”, explains Knoch.

The research consortium consists of RWTH, Forschungszentrum Jülich, the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf HZDR, Stuttgart University, and the Leibnitz Institute for Innovative Microelectronics IHP. The project also involves the companies Aixtron, Siltronic AG, ROVAK – Flash Lamp Systems GmbH, GlobalFoundries, and Rohde&Schwarz.